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Chord variations

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Chord variations

Postby Eftwyrd » Mon Dec 17, 2012 4:28 pm

Am I missing something or are the Chord variations which were present in Notion 3 gone?
For example a Bm Chord. There is only ONE style of the chord! For example I want the chord played on the seventh Fret or just other fingerstyle...in Notion 3 there were many many variations. I would need this to use other Chord positions while working with slash marks. Otherwise it just sounds wrong. SO anybody can help?

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Re: Chord variations

Postby Surfwhammy » Tue Dec 18, 2012 3:23 am

Eftwyrd wrote:Am I missing something or are the Chord variations which were present in Notion 3 gone?
For example a Bm Chord. There is only ONE style of the chord! For example I want the chord played on the seventh Fret or just other fingerstyle...in Notion 3 there were many many variations. I would need this to use other Chord positions while working with slash marks. Otherwise it just sounds wrong. SO anybody can help?

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As best as I have been able to determine, they are gone . . .

The NOTION 4 User Manual specifically refers to the word "More" appearing once you have a basic chord pattern selected, and I suppose the idea is that by clicking on "More" you are presented with other fingering options, but there is no "More" word anywhere, so my best guess at present is that the "More" feature is gone . . .

However, once you make sense of how it works--which takes a while--you can specify notes on the fretboard and audition the resulting chord, which might work if you actually play guitar and know a good bit about guitar chords and different voicings . . .

Nevertheless, I think there is a practical way to do what you want to do, and after doing a bit of experimenting over several hours I am beginning to see a solution . . .

Using the chord library and fretboard is not so intuitive for me, and they do not appear to interact the way I would prefer, but once you have a chord pattern box above the guitar notation staff and have added some rhythm slash notes for strumming, you can select the chord pattern box and its notes appear on the fretboard, where you then can change the notes on the fretboard, which in turn changes the chord pattern box (see the screen capture below) . . .

However, changing the finger positions for the chord pattern box does not change the name of the chord, but you can ignore chord names, but you can use one of the web-based "chord name" programs to determine a good name for the chord, where the "chord name" programs are similar to the NOTION 4 fretboard, so you just put the dots in the right places; press a button; and a name or set of possible names for the chord appears . . .

This is a non-standard use, but the notes play correctly and once you do it for a few chord patterns, it is very easy to do when you know guitar chords . . .

As an example, I had a bit of FUN with some chords which essentially would be impossible to play but sound very nice, and after devising a nice pattern, I added a chord which is easy to play, but the problem was getting it drawn as a chord pattern box with the correct fingering, with this leading after a few hours to discovering the aforementioned technique . . .

[NOTE: I call this chord "D9", even though technically it is a "Minor 6th", but I also call it a "Middle Stormy Monday" chord (as contrasted to a "Low Stormy Monday" chord), which works for me, since the notes are what matters and the chord pattern box correctly indicates the notes, where for reference it is a Rhythm and Blues, as well as a Jazz, chord, and it has the same finger pattern as a four-finger diminished chord played on the four highest pitch strings, hence is an outstanding chord when you need to play something but have no idea what key the song is in, or anything else about the song, because if you play it quickly in several different locations on the fretboard, it sounds as if you actually know what you are doing . . . :lol: ]

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(1) You create a chord pattern box, which can be any chord, where C Major works just as well as any other chord . . .

(2) Then you insert or place the chord pattern box on top of the music notation staff for the NOTION 4 bundled Electric Guitar . . .

(3) Then you insert four quarter notes anywhere on the music notation staff, observing that these will be changed to rhythm slashes in the next step . .

(4) Select the measure, including the chord pattern box and the four quarter notes you entered, and then right click and change the quarter notes to rhythm slashes . . .

At this point, you have a chord pattern box and four rhythm slashes to strum the chord on each of the four beats of the measure, which is fine for sketching the chord pattern for a song . . .

Now you can select the measure and copy it to the clipboard, followed by pasting it at the start of the next measure, and then you can select the chord pattern box and change the notes via the fretboard . . .

The chord name will be wrong, although if you know the correct chord name you can change it, but regardless the correct notes for the chord you specified are played via the rhythm slashes . . .

And you could leave the names all all the chords as C and just ignore them . . .

This is a rather odd way to do a quick sketch of the chords for a song, but it works, and once you do it a few times, it is very fast when you happen to play electric guitar and know a lot of chords . . .

And it is quicker that drawing lines and dots on a note card with a pencil, which is the other way I do chord pattern sketches for songs . . .

THOUGHTS

This might not be a lot of help, but I think it is a pretty cool undocumented "feature", which is fabulous . . .

Fabulous! :D
Last edited by Surfwhammy on Tue Dec 18, 2012 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chord variations

Postby Eftwyrd » Tue Dec 18, 2012 11:26 am

mh like always a very very long answer but nevertheless this time it helped me. thanks, this way it works very well :)
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Re: Chord variations

Postby Surfwhammy » Tue Dec 18, 2012 1:35 pm

Eftwyrd wrote:mh like always a very very long answer but nevertheless this time it helped me. thanks, this way it works very well :)


Glad to help!
:)

Once you have a measure with a chord pattern box and four quarter-note duration rhythm slashes (see image below), it is easy to copy and paste it to the next measure, at which time you can select the chord pattern box for the newly pasted measure by clicking on it, and then you can use the fingerboard to specify the notes you want, followed by double-clicking on the chord pattern box to put it into "text chord name" mode, where you can give the new chord a proper name, with the proper name coming from one of the web-based "chord name" programs or from memory if you already know the correct name for the chord . . .

[NOTE: This chord actually is an Fm6, but I map it mentally to the lowest note, which is a D at the fifth fret of the low-pitch "A" string, which is a bit odd, but it works for me. More precisely, it is the middle four strings version of the chord at the end of the hallmark electric guitar phrase for "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" (James Brown), where it is the same four notes as the four highest notes of what I call the "low" chord for the James Brown song, where for reference in my naming system "low" indicates that the root note probably is on the low-pitch "E" string, but "middle" indicates that the root note probably is on the low-pitch "A" string, and for the most part "middle" chords usually are played with four fingers and are limited to notes on the middle four strings ("A", "D", "G", "b"). And there are "high" four-note chords, as well, where this mostly is a Rhythm and Blues or Jazz type of chord system, where the general goal is to be able to play scales, phrases, and melodies using these types of essentially four-finger chords, which in a more practical sense makes it a bit like doing four-part harmony with "tight" chords on a rhythm guitar, since I consider these types of chords to be "tight" as well, where "tight" refers to the intervals typically being constrained, which in the grand scheme of everything makes it all the more difficult with respect to being a fascinating puzzle . . . ]

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These are the two chords ("low" version played at the 5th fret and "middle" version played at the 9th fret), and these actually are D9 chords . . .

[NOTE: Because there is a horn section, the song is played in E♭ (or D# as we call it here in the sound isolation studio), hence the relative frets are 6 and 10 rather than 5 and 9, and the chord being played most of the time is the second version of the chord rather than the first version, but so what. Horn players like this chord, because it has tension and they can play virtually anything to it. Also note that the version of the chord on the right is a six-string chord. If you work at it a while, you can discover how to use your index and little finger to play two notes each, but the chord also can be played with only four or five notes . . . ]

"Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" (James Brown) -- 1967 -- YouTube concert video

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Entering rhythm guitar chords this way is a bit non-standard and does not appear to be documented anywhere specifically, but it works, and it creates a rhythm guitar pattern that plays when you press the "Play" button, for sure . . .

For sure! :ugeek:

P. S. The "middle" Fm6 is an excellent chord, and it is heard in the rhythm guitar lead-in to "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" (Elvis Preslely), which is fabulous . . .

[NOTE: Scotty Moore knew a lot of chords when he was playing guitar for Elvis--probably still knows all of them and a few more--and he was able to use them in melodic phrases, where most of the chords were what I call "tight" chords . . . ]

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Chord Pattern for Intro to "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" (Elvis Presley) ~ NOTION 4

NOTION Bundled 4 Electric Guitar "I Want You" Intro -- WAV (2.6MB, 1411-kbps, approximately 15 seconds)

"I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" (Elvis Preslely) -- YouTube music video

Fabulous! :D
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