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What happened to Notion?

A Forum to Discuss NOTION

Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby sepheritoh » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:40 pm

I do not think the point is if they are composing music or not. The point is that we are not talking about a toy.

We are talking about a group of 9 people. No, it is not representative of the population of this country. The point is that we have a new technology which is embraced by one group of people. The fact that others in a different industry are choosing to call this a toy will make those who choose to do so be left behind.

Here we are talking about a company (Notion) who is making an effort to embrace this technology, but they are being insulted and slandered by people who calls this a toy. You are welcome to do so. Nobody is saying that you have to embrace this new technology. The traditional PC DAW will remain the mainstream composing tool for many years or decades to come. However, no need to be dismissive of those who wish to move on to new ways.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Fri Jun 10, 2011 6:08 pm

sepheritoh wrote:I do not think the point is if they are composing music or not. The point is that we are not talking about a toy.



We are talking about a group of 9 people. No, it is not representative of the population of this country. The point is that we have a new technology which is embraced by one group of people. The fact that others in a different industry are choosing to call this a toy will make those who choose to do so be left behind.

Here we are talking about a company (Notion) who is making an effort to embrace this technology, but they are being insulted and slandered by people who calls this a toy. You are welcome to do so. Nobody is saying that you have to embrace this new technology. The traditional PC DAW will remain the mainstream composing tool for many years or decades to come. However, no need to be dismissive of those who wish to move on to new ways.


Totally disagree : If people don't use this technology to embrace Notion products it doesn't matter if this toy can launch missiles or run an entire city..Notion stands to make little or nothing from this if Musician' s and composers don't embrace it.

Left Behind? Nobody gets left behind. That is ridiculous to say. Some of the people who are arguing against Notion pouring the bulk of their resources into a technology that has not shown itself yet to be supported by consumers who will buy their product while leaving their faithful customers in a lurch are some of the most techno-savvy people around.

You are overly dramatic in your argument..insulted, slandered..?? Don't make it so personal! No one's being being 'dismissive. What we are trying to do is say''Hey, we bought into the technology, we have ALREADY paid good money for the product and will continue to do so, yet, as soon as we buy in you tell us Tough luck. we're moving on. As I said.. do the iPad thing, just don't short change we who have already PAID our money for the product with the expectation of SUPPORT and UPGRADES on a regular basis, not on a 'Well we're doing something else now, and you may or may not get anything else.

Fact is, when I got the Notion advertisement in my inbox, and I got all excited about it, then they should have said up front, BTW 'As soon as you buy into this, we're moving on and won't be focusing on your system anymore so we can focus on the new toys' I would have thought twice about offering up my VISA debit and looked elsewhere.

Maybe there are some good programmers out there who can take what Notion is about to abandon, and cash in on developing a similar product for the THOUSANDS of computers already in existence that use this technology in their studios and who don't plan on getting the new IToy anytime soon!
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby pcartwright » Fri Jun 10, 2011 7:17 pm

geebo2b wrote:Notion stands to make little or nothing from this if Musician' s and composers don't embrace it.


I agree, but I think it's worth Notion's time to give it a shot. An iPad, Android, etc app may appeal to certain musicians with certain needs. It's a risk worth taking, but Notion should probably go back full steam to desktop applications if the tablet concept fails.

geebo2b wrote:Maybe there are some good programmers out there who can take what Notion is about to abandon, and cash in on developing a similar product for the THOUSANDS of computers already in existence that use this technology in their studios and who don't plan on getting the new IToy anytime soon!


The folks at Notion have said that they haven't given up on the desktop program, and I think we need to take their word for it, though I would like to know that some of their resources are being used to continue Notion 3 (or Notion 4) development.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby vintagevibes » Fri Jun 10, 2011 7:34 pm

The really sad part about all this is that the Notion concept is needed and is unique. I understand that many businesses now are having to do whatever it takes to survive but what if Sibelius 8 is infused with ProTools audio technology? They could rob Notion of their big chance to corner the market on this concept. In my daydreams Cakewalk buys Notion....
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:09 pm

Well, for me, I have looked at the I-pad2 and music apps for it. They're good and fun BUT, that being said, for me, the ability to load a full orchestral score and write for full orchestra, with all the articulations, and fx that orchestras produce is what I do. I sometimes use the Garageband type app for simple projects,, but Hardcore full Orchestra is what I do and love to do. I don't use LOOPS, I create the music from scratch and WRITE the score,> I don't play live and loop a track (only sometimes). It is what I love, it is what attracted me Notion because I don't have an orchestra sitting here. I have dozens of needs as regarding Notions abilities to further enhance my Orchestra writing that need to be implemented and developed and was hoping to get some of that but instead I am looking at no real significant improvements in Notion becaus :D e they will be pouring the bulk of their money and expertise into iPad. So yes I am disappointed!!
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby vintagevibes » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:36 pm

Well I don't have an iPad but I really do think that it's a viable platform even though I don't need it. The Notion "realtime-notaton-DAW" concept is what made me buy it even though I own Sibelius. I really wish there was a way for them to keep up the development momentum.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby Surfwhammy » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:52 pm

In a discussion like this, I find it useful to focus on facts, and toward the goal of focusing on facts, these are a few of what I consider to be facts:

(1) There are both Mac and Windows version of Notion 3 . . .

From a Computer Science perspective, this fact provides the very important clue that Notion Music has developed a software engineering strategy that makes it practical to design and program a dual-platform application, which additionally suggests for example that making improvements and enhancements to the Mac version of NOTION is very likely to map to making similar or identical improvements and enhancements to the Windows version of NOTION, and vice-versa . . .

At present, I have not done a recent detailed survey of the current state of the art in multi-platform application development systems, but I know that Real Software has a multi-platform application development system that makes it possible to use one set of source code to create applications for the Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, as well as for web-based applications, and I know this because I have been a registered user of REALbasic for nearly a decade, although more recently the product is called "Real Studio" . . .

Real Software

It is not a completely and totally one-to-one type of thing, since there are platform-specific nuances, but this is handled by including "compiler directives", which are specifically tagged and identified sections of code that are used when compiling and building a version of the application for a specific platform . . .

For example, in REALbasic this is an example of the way to indicate that a section of code is specific to the Mac with a compiler directive (which is indicated by the pound sign ["#"]):

Code: Select all
#if TargetMacOS then
     Declare Function SpeakString lib "SpeechLib" (SpeakString as pstring) as Integer
#endif


At present, I have no idea precisely how Notion Music does multi-platform development, but so what . . .

So what!

The facts are (a) that Notion Music does multi-platform application development and (b) that there is some type of system or set of procedures for doing it . . .

Another useful bit of information is that at some level, which might be so deep that it only happens in the low-level C/API universe, there are not so many differences in doing GUI application programming . . .

People like to imagine that everything is totally different at the dawn of the early-21st century, but the reality is that all the primitive stuff is pretty much the same now as it was 25 years ago . . .

And on the Mac side of the universe, it is not difficult to look at a few of the API functions and realize that for all practical purposes you are looking at NeXTSTEP API functions and variables, which originates with NeXT Computer in the later half of the 1980s when Steve Jobs left Apple and started NeXT Computer, where nearly a decade later Steve Jobs returned to Apple and then Apple purchased NeXT Computer, and so forth and so on . . .

Code: Select all
NSArray *objects = [self arrangedObjects];


When I first saw the "NS" prefix about a decade ago as I was starting to learn about Mac OS X application development, it took me a while to connect the dots but not so long really . . .

Really!

(2) The various technologies and algorithms that comprise NOTION are the "family jewels" of Notion Music, and as such there simply is no possibility that Notion Music will abandon NOTION. In essence, abandoning NOTION would be like The Coca-Cola Company deciding to stop making Coca-Cola or Starbucks deciding to stop making coffee . . .

(3) There is significant commonality among Mac OS X and iOS, and all the low-level C and C++ code is identical, which is very important when one is focusing on mathematical algorithms, since most of the detailed graphic and audio work is done with mathematical algorithms that in varying degrees are platform agnostic or platform independent . . .

For example, incrementing an integer variable in low-level C code is that same no matter what the platform, although there are differences in the types and flavors of integer variables, and there is the matter of Little Endian and Big Endian, although this no longer is a consideration for Mac and Windows applications, since they both run on Intel or Intel-compatible processors, although for Mac PPC computers it continues to be a consideration, but it is handled by the compiler and so forth and is the reason for the Universal Binary, which provides both PPC and Intel flavors of Mac OS X applications . . .

Code: Select all
i = i + 1;


If you have a few months with nothing to do and want to entertain yourself by reading and studying some of the most boring application programming documentation in the known universe, then you can verify this for yourself, but if you have better things to do--for example composing music--then I encourage you to trust me on this one . . .

There are a few significant differences in Mac OS X and iOS, but if you apply a bit of smarts to your strategy, the differences can be kept to a minimum, which in the grand scheme of everything essentially maps (a) to separating platform-specific code from platform-independent code and (b) to doing as much as possible in platform-independent code . . .

For example, instead of using the Core Data framework for relational database activities in iOS, the key is to do relational database work via low-level C/API with SQLite, which translates very nicely to Mac OS X applications and with a bit of thoughtful relational database designing to SQL Server and so forth in the Windows universe, which makes all the more sense when you need to work with highly abstracted metadata, which the Core Data framework simply cannot handle because it does not allow even a tiny bit of carefully and ruthlessly controlled recursion, so instead of needing only perhaps 10 tables, you need to have 1,000 tables . . .

(4) For all practical purposes, nearly everything that Notion Music does in its iPad applications will translate directly to Mac OS X and Windows applications . . .

(5) The first generation iPad sold approximately 15 million units, and sales of the iPad2 are estimated to be in the range of 30 million units this year (2011) . . .

This makes it quite likely that there will be 75 to 100 million iPad users by the end of next year (2012), and this is a very significant market . . .

(6) Beginning with iOS 5 and iCloud, which are scheduled to be released in a few months (Fall 2011), it no longer will be a requirement to have a desktop computer to use an iPad, since everything will be available to the iPad via iCloud and a Wi-Fi or cellular connection . . .

(7) The human eyes are able to focus clearly on perhaps one word at a time containing no more than 12 characters in a typical 10-point font . . .

This is very important to understand, because it provides a clue to the realities of working with vast amounts of visual information . . .

I think that I explained this in a previous post, but the reality is that there are two basic ways to work with large sets of visual information:

(a) you can move your head and eyes . . .

OR

(b) you can move the visual information into your field of focus . . .

Another useful bit of information is that if you have perfect color vision and happen to be standing in the middle of a perfectly level 1,000 acre rectangular field of prolifically blooming red roses on a bright sunny day with a clear blue sky, you might think that you can see an ocean of red, but the reality is that approximately 80 to 90 percent of the "red" you think you are seeing is the direct result of your brain performing a quite amazing series of mathematical computations toward the goal of creating a marvelous visual illusion, because the reality is that if you draw a 5" diameter circle on a piece of paper and hold the piece of paper approximately 12" in front of your nose and look directly at the 5" diameter circle, this is the area where there are a sufficient number of cones for your eyes physically to detect the color "red" . . .

Image

[SOURCE: The Rods and Cones of the Human Eye (Hyperphysics)

[NOTE: I am not suggesting that the iPad will replace orchestra scores and sheet music printed on paper, but I am suggesting that what might appear to be patently goofy actually is not the least bit goofy. The practical perspective is that for older folks, such as myself, the idea of not having a physical keyboard and mouse is beyond disturbing and simply is not going to happen, but even though it will require a bit of learning new skills, I think that there are some things that will be much easier to do via a touch screen or touch pad and a few finger gestures. Initially, I absolutely hated the idea of not having printed books, but after a lot of hooting and hollering, as well as bit of learning new skills, the fact of the matter is that I do a lot more reading with digital references and documentation that I did when I was spending thousands of dollar every year on technical books . . . ]

(8) Apple is releasing Mac OS X Lion next month (July 2011), and if Notion 3 is not completely and fully compatible with Mac OS X Lion, then Notion Music either (a) will do at least a minimal update to Notion 3 for its Mac customer base or (b) will let its Mac customers know to "hold that thought" on upgrading to Mac OS X Lion . . .

I have seen no announcements so far from any of my favorite digital music application providers (Celemony, IK Multimedia, MOTU, Notion Music, and Wave Arts) regarding Mac OS X Lion, so perhaps there are no incompatibilities . . .

[NOTE: My current plan is to order a new 2TB hard drive from Other World Computing and to clone my current Mac OS X Snow Leopard hard drive, which on the Mac Pro is virtually trivial to do . . . ]

(9) The primary limitation on NOTION at present is the fact that it runs in a 32-bit application space, which also is the case with everything else I use, with the recent exception of T-RackS 3.5 Deluxe (IK Multimedia), although I have not verified that it actually is running as a 64-bit application, since I am not running 64-bit Mac OS X Snow Leopard, and this is the case in the Windows universe as well . . .

Apple and Microsoft have had 64-bit operating systems for quite a while, but the reality is that there are very few 64-bit applications, although there are plenty of "64-bit compatible" applications, but making a 32-bit application "64-bit compatible" mostly maps to using 64-bit API functions and variables rather than 32-bit API functions and variables, which for a well-designed application maps to changing a few compiler flags and about 15 to 30 minutes of compiling and building . . .

Doing a complete redesign for 64-bit multicore symmetrical multiprocessing, multitasking, and multithreading computing is such a monumental task that it rivals designing and building a commercial airplane or rocket ship, and this is the primary reason that there will not be a lot of 64-bit applications for a long time, although in the Apple universe the fact of the matter is that Apple actually takes the time to do a few 64-bit applications correctly, which Apple can do because it has the vast resources and motivations to do it, which is the case with a few of Microsoft's flagship applications and services, where as I recall there is a 64-bit version of Microsoft SQL Server that is specifically designed and programmed to exploit everything involved in 64-bit computing . . .

And it is not so much a matter of NOTION being constrained to a 32-bit application space as it is a matter of all the virtual instrument sound samples being constrained to 32-bit application space in one way or another . . .

As best as I have been able to determine, it appears that everything is loaded into one 32-bit application workspace on the Mac, which I based on observing real-time memory usage via Activity Monitor, where there consistently is approximately 4GB of unused memory all the time, which could be due to running Mac OS X Snow Leopard in 32-bit mode, although perhaps not. I can do a few experiments to explore this in more detail, which might be interesting, but there was a reason for not running the Mac Pro in full 64-bit mode, although at present I do not recall the actual reason, other than it caused problems with something that was important . . .

(10) Developing and marketing iPad applications has great potential for being a significant revenue stream for Notion Music, either as the direct result of selling iPad applications or as the indirect result of free iPad applications driving sales of NOTION, and the reality is that doing Mac OS X and Windows application development in the digital music arena is expensive, so having an increased revenue stream is very important for an application that is focused on customers who have sufficient knowledge and expertise to make sense of music notation and can keep track of everything all the instruments in a symphonic orchestra are doing in real-time, which also applies to those folks such as myself who are able to do essentially the same thing but with a virtual festival of DISCO and Pop instruments, although I have been hearing symphonies in my mind since I was a toddler . . .

(11) If you can compose in music notation a two minute piece for a string quartet and nobody who listens to it recommends that you need to pursue other career options, then I think it is reasonable to suggest you are in the 99th percentile, more or less . . .

(12) I have no idea how many copies of Notion 3 have been sold, but I know that it took about three or so months for IK Multimedia to get 10,000 of its customers to "friend" it on Facebook, and when the 10,000 mark was met this mapped to everyone getting a 30 percent discount on IK Multimedia products, which provides the clue that either (a) IK Multimedia customers are so wealthy that only its impoverished customers care about discounts or (b) IK Multimedia has about 10,000 customers, and for reference IK Multimedia also is focusing on iPad and iPhone applications at present, but it continues to do Mac OS X and Windows applications for its flagship desktop applications, where it just released two new compressors for T-RackS and did a 64-bit update to T-RackS 3 Deluxe (v3.5), which as best as I can determine is that way it works, where one might suggest reasonably that the little applications effectively fund the development of the big applications . . .

Lots of FUN! :)
Last edited by Surfwhammy on Sat Jun 11, 2011 6:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Sat Jun 11, 2011 12:32 am

Surfwhammy said;IK Multimedia customers are so wealthy that only its impoverished customers care about discounts or..

I am one of those impoverished customers and was attracted becasue of the group buy price.

As usual, surfwhammy is spot on with regard to his/her assessment of the facts. I am not a computer science whiz, in fact am just an 'end user' so I cannot comment at all on programming languages, multi-platform protocols or anything along those lines.

All I can say, as a composer who writes for large orchestra, Notion was the first program with a reasonable price that gave me entry into a world that has been denied me for years. That world is the ability to realize some approximate recording of my orchestral works. That is, it has been a life long dream realized. The thought that the technology that finally gave me access to something I have waited for for years may be , if not abandoned, eventually phased out is very disconcerting. I don't have a long enough 'span' of breaths left for the next generations of technology as I am advancing in years. I don't have a lot of time to spend on technological 'learning curves' in order to just 'write my music'. It is painful enough to have to spend almost an equal amount of time learning the technology and the programs just to 'write' what I know how to do. I just want to 'write/' and record my music. I am all for Notion making all the money they want and writing programs for computerized hamburgers if they so desire. I am just asking that they spend no less time and effort upgrading their 'flagship' program. I hate thinking that some of the great ideas presented for Notion upgrades are going to be filed in the circular file becasue some exec may say 'We're not budgeting for that' I don't care what we promised, we have new vistas to explore.

This, after all, is especially troubling since 1: I have already bought in to the technology, 2: I have centered my composition and recording around the technology, 3: I can't afford to begin replacing the technology either with $$$ or more 'learning curves'. I just want to write and record and know that I will be supported. that is all. All the debate and arguments and facts are outside the scope of what I came here for.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby Surfwhammy » Sat Jun 11, 2011 6:38 am

geebo2b wrote:Surfwhammy said;IK Multimedia customers are so wealthy that only its impoverished customers care about discounts or..

I am one of those impoverished customers and was attracted becasue of the group buy price.


This is one of the things I like about IK Multimedia, and as one of their impoverished customers I am on their mailing list, and I check announcements in the IK Multimedia FORUM daily, as well as check the Musician's Friend "Stupid Deal of the Day", which is the way I got Sonik Synth 2 for $50, for sure . . .

For sure! :idea:

geebo2b wrote:All I can say, as a composer who writes for large orchestra, Notion was the first program with a reasonable price that gave me entry into a world that has been denied me for years. That world is the ability to realize some approximate recording of my orchestral works. That is, it has been a life long dream realized.


This is one of the truly amazing aspects of Notion 3, and while I had thoughts every once in a while of having access to an orchestra and other instruments, the best I was able to do was a KORG Triton Music Workstation (88-Keys), which has a nice range of orchestral instruments when augmented with add-on modules, but the problem for me is that it requires being able to play keyboards proficiently, which for the most part maps to requiring a lot of practicing to do one part, hence is not very practical . . .

On the other hand, I can play a lot of notes very rapidly when I consume huge quantities of very strong coffee and temporarily get in touch with my "inner idiot savant", at which point I simply play whatever appears in my mind instantly without giving it any immediately conscious thought, but this particular skill is pretty much useless for playing very precise instrumental parts, really . . .

"Starlight" (The Surf Whammys) -- Kick Drum, Electric Guitar, Grand Piano, Synthesized Fog -- MP3

Really! :o

geebo2b wrote:1: I have already bought in to the technology, 2: I have centered my composition and recording around the technology, 3: I can't afford to begin replacing the technology either with $$$ or more 'learning curves'. I just want to write and record and know that I will be supported. that is all.


This is the reality here in the sound isolation studio, as well, and I am very happy with Notion 3 being the foundation for my new digital music production "system" or "formula", for sure . . .

For sure!

It took me quite a while to discover all the rules for getting everything to work together accurately, reliably, and repeatably, but now that I know the rules and have incorporated the rules into a complete "system" or "formula", everything is taking considerably less time than it did one year ago . . .

I have not tested the "system" or "formula" in the WIndows universe and currently have no plans to do so, but in the Mac universe everything is working very nicely, which makes it possible for me to focus on new aspects of digital music production, where at present I am focusing on making sense of panning and "sparkles" . . .

You have the same primary software applications that I use (Digital Performer and Notion), so if you need help with anything, let me know . . .

In an Utopian world, it might be nice if a lot of things worked differently or better, but in the Mac universe once you discover the rules, everything works accurately, reliably, and repeatably . . .

OBSERVATION RE: SOFTWARE ENGINEERS

One of the more useful bits of information about software engineering is that programmers tend to start with simple algorithms and then enhance them, so what happens is that the simple behaviors of an application are tested and perfected throughout the development process, while more advanced enhancements tend to receive less overall attention, not because advanced enhancements are less important but instead because the simple behaviors are tested from the beginning, which continues throughout the development process. Consequently, there tend to be no problems with the simple things, which is one of the reasons I make an effort to do everything in the simplest possible way, which generally includes avoiding using dynamics and articulations unless there is no way to avoid it, which also is the case with the "double bar" repeating stuff and so forth and so on, as well as filling blank space in the last part of a measure with explicit properly-valued rests . . .

As a general rule, doing everything in the most simple possible way tends to map to a lot of repetitive low-level activities, but it works like a champ, and in the grand scheme of everything the realities here in the sound isolation studio are (a) that I now have a vast virtual orchestra with perhaps half a million possible instruments and (b) that I can control it directly via music notation, which is made possible by Notion 3 and IK Multimedia virtual instruments . . .

Hence, even if it requires 500 hours to do a silly DISCO or Pop song that runs for 3 to 5 minutes, what do I care?

Not much!

The reality is that a real orchestra with 100 musicians might be able to do it in 5 hours, but it would cost $!00,000, and in terms of total musician hours it takes 500 hours, so my perspective is that I am quite happy to be able to do it in 500 hours by myself at no cost other than my time, which is fabulous . . .

Fabulous! :)

P. S. Regarding a new version of NOTION, yet another fact is that one of the basic realities of business makes it abundantly clear that there will be a new version of NOTION in the not so distant future, because it is guaranteed way for Notion Music to make more money . . .

Yet another reality is that one year ago I did not know what a "VST" and "VSTi" were, even though I have been using VST plug-ins with Digital Performer for about eight years, more or less . . .

I did not know there was music notation software until about a year ago, and although I have known that there is something called "MIDI" for quite a while, I only did something with MIDI about two months ago . . .

So a good bit of the 1,500 to 2,000 hours required to get the "system" or "formula" defined and tested includes a lot of learning time, which includes recalling a lot of the music notation that I learned as a child, as well as learning how to do percussion instruments with music notation, which is fine with me, really . . .

Really!
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby dcuny » Mon Jun 13, 2011 3:10 am

The suggestion has been made (not from NOTION Music staff) that NOTION Music is looking to the iOS platform to supplement their revenue stream. It's been further argued that this is somehow a good thing for current Notion 3 users.

I disagree. If (and it's an if) NOTION Music has to look for to other sources to support their flagship product, that's a very bad sign for Notion users, since it indicates that the profits aren't there to support Notion on the PC.

It appears that NOTION Music hasn't got the resources to support development of iOS products and simultaneously continue work on Notion 3. From this standpoint, work on iOS diverts work on Notion 3, and is not to the immediate benefit of Notion 3 users. Rather, it indicates a shift away from the PC as the primary platform. NOTION Music has already indicated that is will result in a longer turnaround on fixes for Notion 3. At worst, a large success on the iOS platform could mean a move away from the PC platform in general.

When I purchased Protege some time back, I noted to support staff that the product appeared to be abandoned. There were promises in the forum of bug fixes being just around the corner, only to languish with no follow up. Despite all appearances to the contrary, I was assured by support that Protege had not been abandoned, and would continue to be supported. Months later, it was announced that the upgrade path to Protege would be through Notion.

My impression from posts in the the Progression forum is that product is essentially on hold as well. If I were a betting man, I'd bet that Progression was dead as a PC-based product. The future is likely as an iOS product, with Notion replacing it on the PC platform. (Again, this is complete speculation).

What isn't speculation is that Notion 3 is in a holding pattern while work on the iOS platform is done. NOTION Music appears to view work on the iOS platform as a spectrum benefiting all Notion users. For example, they've been posting that "great things" had been around the corner before the announcement of the iOS product. But since I don't plan on getting an iPad, where's the benefit to me?

Not long ago, I noticed that Notion 3 played the flute sample oddly. At first, I thought that perhaps it was playing the clarinet sample by accident, but it turned out that it was playing it with the non-vib sample instead, no matter what playing technique I selected.

To my mind, this is a pretty basic bug.

When I reported the bug, I got no indication what sort of priority the bug would have, and when it might be corrected. I'm not holding my breath, instead, I'm using the GPO library flute.

My expectation is that Notion will not be abandoned in the short run. But for those of us without an iOS device, I think NOTION Music can understand how we might be less than enthusiastic about a focus on iOS development.
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