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What happened to Notion?

A Forum to Discuss NOTION

Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:21 pm

or my own, I play the organ, and I remember that Robert said to me in 1972 "This instrument is too much complicated for me". Ahahahaha !!!
That is funny!! Someone with his consummate artistry saying something like that!! Unimaginable!
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby achambily » Thu Jun 09, 2011 3:03 pm

Yes ;)
He was a very simple man, with a lot of humor.
One day, he had the opportunity to play with Einstein just "for the fun".
When a journalist asked him "How is Pr Einstein's playing ?" he answered "Relatively" :)
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby Surfwhammy » Thu Jun 09, 2011 5:16 pm

geebo2b wrote:So far, I haven't seen too many people with iPads, but the dozen or so I have seen have been in the hands of children playing video games on them. So far, from my experience, iPad is indeed a toy. It is possible sales figures tell a different story but I just haven't seen the 'rush' to use those things yet.


As with everything, there are a lot of perspectives on computing devices, and this certainly is the case with the iPad . . .

The best information on sales data I have found suggests that the first generation iPad had sales of approximately 15 million units, and the projections for the iPad2 in 2011 are sales of approximately 28 million, but the more revealing information is that it took the iPad less time to reach the 1 million sales mark than it took the iPhone . . .

Realistically, the iPad in 2011 is where the iPod was sometime in 2002 or perhaps early 2003 . . .

In the early-1950s, I think that a lot of folks might have suggested that the electric guitar was a "toy", but the reality is that the electric guitar was a new instrument that transformed popular music and the role of guitar in an ensemble, which mostly was a matter of amplification and the fact that by virtue of being heard the electric guitar became a lead instrument, as contrasted to a rhythm or accompanying instrument . . .

[NOTE: One of the more curious things about electric guitar took me nearly half a century to realize, which to be specific is that "Purple Haze" (The Jimi Hendrix Experience) basically is an adaptation of "The Hall of the Mountain King" (Edvard Grieg), which from my perspective is simply mind-boggling. I should have recognized this much earlier, but it was not until I did the Angela Gossow's Underpants song that I had the epiphany . . . ]

Nevertheless, I am quite comfortable with the suggestion that at present the iPad is used primarily as if it were a toy, but from the perspective of Computer Science, the fact of the matter is that the iPad is an extraordinarily sophisticated computing device, but so what . . .

So what!

Another reality is that I devote a lot of attention to pondering the future, and as a consequence of this my perspectives on the iPad are a bit different . . .

geebo2b wrote:As far as the statement that if Notion doesn't head towards the iPad market, then Notion upgrades will cost the price of a small war in a failed state, I just wonder if it is that accurate?. I don't know, I just find it worriesome and troubling from a business ethics standpoint. By that I mean, when I am sold on a product and finally jump in and spend my hard earned dollars on it and re-tool my work to depend on that product, I find it very stressful to imagine that that product as I invested in it may be abandoned. Has this happened in the past ?? YES!!


My thinking in this respect is based primarily on over thirty years experience in advanced software engineering, and one of the realities at the dawn of the early-21st century is that high-end Mac OS X application software engineers are not inexpensive . . .

If I were making estimates, then I might be comfortable suggesting that Notion Music would need to sell somewhere in the range of 2,000 to 4,000 upgrade licenses for a new version of NOTION at $200 each to pay for one year of the services of a high-end Mac OS X software engineer with specific expertise in audio and music technologies, at least in the contract programming arena, and when the focus shifts to iOS software engineering, I think one can add another few thousand upgrades, where it is useful to understand that this covers everything (salary, benefits, office, computers, test laboratory, and so forth and so on) . . .

[NOTE: To avoid any possibility of confusion, I am not suggesting that a high-end Mac OS X and iOS software engineer with extensive audio and music expertise has a market value in the range of $200 to $500 per hour on a contract programming basis, but I am suggesting that when you consider all the infrastructure and human resources, this is a reasonable way to map the overall total cost for one high-end Mac OS X and iOS software engineer, which includes the graphic designing, testing and quality controlling, manufacturing, distributing, marketing, technical support, supervising, and accounting costs and so forth and so on, as well as profit for the company owners, and this also includes the overhead for the agency that provides the contract software engineer. Typically all these things are treated separately, but this is a way to get a "ballpark" perspective on the business realities . . . ]

So, part of my thinking revolves around two unknowns, which to be specific are (a) the number of Notion 3 customers and (b) the amount of money customers are ready, willing, and able to pay for a major version upgrade, and all I can do is guess, really . . .

Really!

For all I know, Notion Music might have 10 software engineers, and this makes a bit of sense from the perspective of the focus shifting for a while to iPad application development, which in turn is the reason for my hypothesis that the current shift to focusing on the iPad is a way to increase revenue, which I think is a very smart and practical strategy . . .

QUESTION: Would you pay $200 for a major version upgrade of NOTION, which is what the fine folks at MOTU currently charge for a major version upgrade to their flagship product, Digital Performer?

Observing in the "semantics" department that if a musical composition has string, brass, woodwind, and similar sections but no electric bass, electric guitar, and synthesizers, then I call it "Classical", and I get the sense that there are lot of folks who use Notion 3 for "Classical" music, although I am just as comfortable using the terms "Orchestral" and "Symphonic". . .

The reality here in the sound isolation studio is that I had quite a bit of formal training in Classical music as a child due primarily to being in a liturgical boys choir, at which time I learned how to sight-sing Classical music--specifically treble clef--including stuff by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and all those composers, but sometime later I switched to Rock and Roll, at which time I started playing "by ear", which is entirely different from playing music notation stuff . . .

Yet, around this time last year I realized that there was no practical way for me to play a Bulería rhythm pattern on the real drumkit here in the sound isolation studio, so recalling that I already knew quite a bit about music notation, I did some research and found Miroslav Philharmonik, which then led to Notion SLE for Miroslav Philharmonik and a week or so later to upgrading to Notion 3, which mostly was a matter of this being the most practical way to add IK Multimedia virtual instruments to the virtual instrument palette, and approximately one year later, I can do a lot of stuff easily that I never realized I could do in any immediately conscious way, perhaps because either (a) it simply was not practical until about a year ago or (b) I had no sense until recently . . .

In some respects, using a colloquialism from the Deep South, my comprehension of everything might suggest that I recently fell off a turnip truck, but in other respects I have vast knowledge of music that is a bit mind-boggling, which makes it all very paradoxical, really . . .

Really! :ugeek:

More specifically, my primary focus in the Music Theory arena is on the Joseph Schillinger System of Musical Composition (SoMC), which fits nicely with my formal university training in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics, except that yet another reality is that the SoMC probably is as obscure in a practical sense as the Twelve Tone Technique developed by Arnold Schoenberg, but it works for me, and I like it a lot, because it makes sense and fits nicely with the way I relate to music in my mind, which is one of the more fascinating aspects of the SoMC, since it makes sense no matter (a) how little or (b) how much one knows about music . . .

Realistically, I continue to be working on the first chapter, but I read a lot of the words and look at the diagrams in both volumes, and although in some respects I have no idea how any of it actually works in great detail, I get the "big picture", and I use various SoMc techniques when composing songs, although I use them in what most likely are non-standard ways, which is something one learns how to do as the direct consequence of playing "by ear", since as best as I understand the way Music is taught in university and college settings is nearly the reverse of the way one learns to play "by ear", which is an hypothesis that I base primarily on observing that the courses for a Music degree follow a similar pattern to the pattern that is used for an English degree, where the last and most advanced courses introduce students to "Improvising" and "Creative Writing", respectively . . .

In great contrast, one way to explain the basic reality of playing "by ear" is that the aliens from outer space use their time machine to beam you instantly onto a stage at an Elvis Presley concert in 1956, where the spotlight moves from Elvis to you, and then Elvis says, "Take it!", and there you are with a Fender electric guitar and amplifier and Elvis just told you to play a lead guitar solo which you have to compose and play in real-time on the fly, which when you think about it is more than sufficient to make most lead guitar players have a panic attack and wet their underpants (presuming they actually wear underpants), but so what . . .

So what!

Of course, once you understand the rules, you soon discover that the key is to play as many notes as possible and to look like you are having FUN, since as long as the young ladies in the audience are screaming, it makes absolutely no difference what you play, because nobody (including you) actually can hear it, for sure . . .

For sure! :idea:

Summarizing, my general thinking is that it is very likely that iPad applications are an excellent way for the folks at Notion Music to introduce younger folks to the wonders of Notion 3, although there are other reasons for the focus on iPad application development . . .

Yet another reality is that Notion 3 is so vitally important to my "system" here in the sound isolation studio that I have devised a contingency plan for the unusual event that everything disappears, at which time I will do what I call a "hardware and software freeze", which basically maps to obtaining a practical set of backup and replacement hardware components and so forth, so that I essentially can stop time and maintain the "system" for as long as necessary, which is one of the things I do with computing systems (hardware and software) when I like what they do . . .

From this perspective, the great aspect of Notion Music focusing on the iPad is that it virtually guarantees there will be a NOTION update for the Mac sometime in the not so distant future, because the fact of the matter is that there is not so much difference in Mac OS X and iOS, which now that Apple has released public information about Mac OS X "Lion" should be a bit easier to understand . . .

Multi-Touch Gestures (Mac OS X "Lion")

And since Notion Music clearly has a set of techniques for doing Mac and Windows versions of NOTION, it also follows logically and naturally that a new version of NOTION for the Mac maps to corresponding new version of NOTION for Windows . . .

Yet another reality is that at present I compose, perform, and record silly DISCO and Pop songs about ladies underpants, and when I attempt to explain a few of the things I do musically to so-called "normal" people, mostly all I get are blank stares, because the fact of the matter is that few people on this planet understand any of this stuff . . .

Realistically, I have no idea what Notion Music plans to do, but from a practical perspective I think it is accurate to state that the technologies used in Notion 3 are the "family jewels", and I do not envision a future where Notion Music abandons and discards its "family jewels" . . .

It would be like McDonald's deciding to stop making hamburgers and French Fries . . . :shock:

So, from this perspective, the foray into iPad applications is like McDonald's doing salads and specialized coffee, which is fine with me, since (a) it increases sales, (b) increased sales maps to more revenue, and (c) increased revenue provides funding for doing more stuff with the "family jewels" . . .

In other words, the key market is youngsters, and essentially gifting a free copy of something useful and entertaining is a stellar way to introduce youngsters to the "heavy duty" stuff, which in this instance is Notion 3 . . .

geebo2b wrote:Fine, do the Ipad thing..but please don't abandon us old Classically trained people who write for large symphonic sounds Believe it or not we have venues for our works such as supplementing the performances of smaller ensembles, churches, synagogues, and just the joy of composing.


We all have our markets, and one of the more surreal realities here in the sound isolation studio is that the Surf Whammys are very big in the Armenian Christmas arena, where the Angela Gossow's Underpants song continues to the in the Top 5 Highest Ranked "Armenian Christmas" videos on Truveo.com, since it provides definitive proof of the vast importance of a skillfully written YouTube video blurb, which is simply fabulous . . .

Hightest Ranked "Armenian Christmas" Videos (Truveo.com)

Fabulous! :D

P. S. I am planning to reply to all the recent posts, but it takes a while, so to clarify one misunderstanding, when I use the term "high-level", I am not suggesting or implying that I personally am at a higher level than everyone else. Instead, I use the term "high-level" in the sense of "big picture" or the perspective of pondering a forest rather than focusing on the leaves of a single tree, which is a way to refer to attempting to understand a Gestalt, where the total is more than the sum of the parts . . .

In other words, if you consider everyone on the planet in a gracious way, then there are at least as many opinions on everything as there are people, and over the years I have discovered that the best strategy is to avoid wandering too far into becoming overly adamant about nearly anything . . .

Another key bit of information I discovered about a decade ago is that it is entirely too easy to misinterpret written words in online FORUM discussions, since even with smiley faces there are no aural and visual cues to accompany the written words, so it can be very difficult to determine when someone is being serious, silly, sarcastic, or whatever, so when there are several ways to read written words, I usually pause for a while and ponder which way makes the most sense in a gracious way . . .

Explained another way, sometimes if you interpret written words as if you wrote them, this can lead to an interpretation which is entirely different from the way the person writing the words actually intended the words to be read and understood . . .
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby pcartwright » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:12 am

Surfwhammy wrote:I am planning to reply to all the recent posts, but it takes a while


Surfwhammy,

I mean this in the most respectful way possible... would you please shorten yours posts a bit. I'm not opposed to a detailed explanation (I tend to drag out my posts as well), but the length of your posts on the whole is often too large to follow in a single sitting. No offense, but I don't think I've ever read a single post of yours all the way through; I'm sure you have good things to say, but all of the random asides and verbose language makes reading a bit tedious.

I will not claim to be much better; I'm sure my posts can be as drawn out and equally tedious, but I try to be as concise and on point as possible. The level of detail you present is admirable, but I think a lot of the confusion surrounding your posts is due to the length of your response and not necessarily the content of your response.

Regarding the quoted text above, though I'm not a moderator, I think a lot of us would prefer if you didn't give such long responses to every reply. I think we risk losing place in the conversation if we have too many of these lengthy posts.

*** EDIT ***

My rule of thumb for forum post length (which I occasionally break):
- A post is too long if I have to scroll down to finish reading the post (don't get started on screen sizes and resolutions; it's a rule of thumb, not a law of physics.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby pcartwright » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:33 am

Anyway, back on topic...

As noted earlier, Windows has run on tablets for a while now. However, with the recent announcement of Windows 8 (which appears to be designed to run seamlessly between desktop, mobile, and tablet devices alike), it becomes less clear why developing anything more than a freebie program for the iPad is necessary at this time.

I don't know if the Windows 8 model will be successful, but if it is, Apple will likely create a version of OSX (or whatever major OS replaces OSX) to replace iOS to better compete and/or maintain their strength in the tablet/mobile market. If this happens, Notion desktop products in their current form will likely run on any tablet in the not too distant future.

Grant it, we won't know how successful Windows 8 will be for another 18 months at the earliest, so it may still be in Notion's best business interest to compete in the tablet market.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby Surfwhammy » Fri Jun 10, 2011 5:31 am

tubatimberinger wrote:Since the Pc platform has had tablets for about 10 years now, I cannot see it as a new computing device. Also, and I have not tried it yet, but I am certain one could run N3 on such a device, maybe some of the touch features would not transfer seamlessly, but tablets are NOT new. Also, I hope by "high level perspective" you do not imply my perspective to be an inferior or uninformed one. I too know what a manual typewriter is and actually learned music with pen and paper. My background is that of a professionally trained composer, NOT a computer science person however, I have been using Computer Software and MIDI etc. since Windows for Workgroups 3.1 and OS 8 (I am fluent in both platforms).


As noted in an earlier post, I use the term "high-level perspective" in the same way as "big picture" or "Gestalt", not as an indication of superiority, inferiority, or anything like that . . .

In other words, looking through a microscope provides a low-level perspective, but standing on top of a mountain and looking at everything in sight is a high-level perspective . . .

Regarding tablet computing in the Windows universe, Microsoft released Windows for Pen Computing in the early 1990s, at which time I decided to get a Compaq Concerto, which was a bit of FUN for a while, and this is fine, but it is not what the iPad does . . .

Windows for Pen Computing (wikipedia)

Microsoft's strategy always has been to fit Windows onto a form factor, which is entirely different from designing a form factor and then designing an operating system specifically for the form factor, which is the way Apple does things . . .

In fact, at some point it becomes a bit confusing to use the term "tablet", since while the iPad is what I consider to be a type of "tablet", it takes too long to explain the way I define "tablet", other than to say that it is the combination of digital paper, sound, and pen with additional intelligence and awareness . . .

Anything is possible, and sometime in the future when Microsoft gains the legal right to build a complete system other than the Xbox, things might change, which is the reason I consider the Xbox to be what sometime in the future might evolve into a complete system, at which time Microsoft will be able to design the hardware and software with complete control . . .

The reality is that Apple always has enjoyed the legal right to build complete systems, which is quite unique, and additional realities are (a) that Microsoft does not have this legal right and (b) the various hardware vendors who build Windows machines do not have their own operating systems (although IBM attempted it for a while with OS/2 in the early 1990s), so while one can suggest, for example, that DELL has the legal right, it lacks the ability to do the requisite operating system and intimate integration . . .

On the other hand, Amazon.com curiously has the potential to do complete systems, which they currently are doing with the Kindle, but at present their focus primarily is on eBooks, multimedia, and shopping . . .

tubatimberinger wrote:Then, that you frame your biased opinions as realities or matters of fact...

(1) The iPad is not a toy . . .


Maybe my statement was a bit harsh and from a computer science standpoint I see the sexiness of it [the ipad] and I fully understand the future implications of touch screen computing. However, from the stand point of a composer who writes for the instruments the Notion was/is primarily intended for (notice the stock library is an ORCHESTRAL one, not a suite of electric and acoustic guitars basses etc.), to have to work with 15-30 staves on a screen not even the size of a sheet of paper is simply NOT professionally feasible. This sentiment is shared by every composer I know. They all think the ipad is nifty but they all agree "I could never do my real stuff on one" (with the exception of using it as a controller for electronic music which by and large has no score or notational needs). Actually, I cannot think of many real world professional level applications that the ipad in its present form are really adequate for with the exception of MS office, internet browsing and the like. It either lacks the processing power or the actual hardware to complete most tasks. So sorry, for now, it is a toy albeit a very fancy one that if I could afford, I would certainly own myself.


I was going to skip this one, but there is an important bit of information that is worth mentioning . . .

One of the difficulties that occurs when people ponder tablet computing involves the display, and it took me a while and a lot of pondering to make sense of the concepts in a practical way . . .

In the 1990s, I did some work for a company that makes various types of machines that have keys, buttons, and other physical user interface objects, and one of the more fascinating things I discovered is that there is a branch of Psychology that is focused specifically on user interface designing and cognitive engineering, which in this instance mapped among other things to doing studies of the way people use various types of machines that have keys, buttons, and so forth, where one of the techniques involved having test subjects follow a script that had instructions on how to perform various tasks involving the keys, buttons, and so forth . . .

The test subjects were videotaped using high-speed cameras in various locations, and the video then was analyzed in great detail toward the goal of determining the optimal position of each key, button, and so forth, as well as to identify user hesitations, confusion, ease of use, recognition, eye movements, hand and finger motions, and so forth and so on, which in some respects initially appeared to be an excellent way to waste time and money, until I pondered it for a while and realized that, for example, if the machine was a pay telephone and there might be billions of calls made from pay telephones, then it probably makes a bit of sense to ensure that the buttons and everything else are optimally placed, identified, and so forth and so on . . .

So, if you do this with an imaginary tablet computing device and have the abilities (a) to make the tablet do anything you desire, (b) to have the form factor for the tablet be any shape and size, and so forth and so on, then the futuristic aspect involves determining everything about the tablet, which basically is a "what if" thought exercise . . .

If you think it might make sense for a tablet to double as a hot plate, then you simply imagine that you can fry an egg on the tablet, and so forth and so on, since by virtue of being an imaginary device sometime in the future, there are no initial limitations . . .

At some point when the imaginary tablet has a visual display, it is useful to ponder everything that applies to a visual display, and sooner or later this maps to determining whether there are any rules of visual perception that provide a few clues, and one of the more fascinating aspects of displays and visual perception is the fact that nearly nobody with reasonably good vision can see the entire display area of a 20" screen in focus at one time . . .

Yet another reality is that for all practical purposes the usable focus area is remarkably small, which maps to an area smaller than standard business card, which is one of the reasons that the editing window in FORUM editors is not so large (although another reason is so that it will be compatible with lower resolution screens, which historically maps to the approximate size of an IBM computer card or 80 characters) . . .

It takes a while for this to make sense, because it is not something that most people notice intuitively or care about one way or the other, but when you think about it for a while, it is quite enlightening for purposes of understanding the best way to design an imaginary tablet . . .

How much stuff does one actually need to see to do a task productively, quickly, and accurately?

In other words, there is difference in (a) learning how to do a task with 11" by 17" sheets of paper and (b) only being able to do a task with 11" by 17" sheets of paper . . .

My primary writing device is a keyboard, and my primary pointing device is a mouse, and I have used these devices for so long that using anything else is awkward at best, but this does not map to other devices being less optimal or anything else . . .

It is a matter of convenience and personal preference rather than actual necessity in an absolute sense . . .

So, I devote a good bit of attention to pondering the best ways to do various tasks with a tablet, and there are some interesting rules and principles, for sure . . .

For sure!

In other words, an excellent question to ponder is "Why is the iPad the size it is?" . . .

There is no federal law that says an iPad only can be the size it is, so why did Steve Jobs and Jonathan Ive decide on this particular size for the iPad?

Why not make it 1/4" wider or 1/2" taller?

On a related note, regarding working with sheet music and having a larger display, do you think that Mozart needed to look at sheet music to know every intimate detail of the music he composed?

If you only can focus on a small section of display, then I think the key is to devise a way to navigate quickly to whatever you need to see in focus rather than to have a big screen with everything on it . . .

The difference is that with a big screen, you have to move your eyes to change the area of focus, but with a smaller screen, you can look in the same location but move what you need to see to that location, and overall I think that fewer large eye motions maps to better overall clarity, since rapidly looking from far-left to top-center to far-right to far-left and so forth and so on where every eye motion is large very quickly makes most people dizzy and a bit disoriented, if not nauseous . . .

It depends on the person, but I tried a lot of different size displays, and displays larger than 20" (diagonal) make me dizzy and are quite annoying, since I have to devote entirely too much attention to moving my eyes and head to see stuff, which is one of the reasons that the iPad is sized the way it is, although there obviously are other important reasons . . .

Another interesting thing about the iPad2 is that it has a significantly higher resolution than a typical desktop computer display, so while the dimensions of the iPad2 display area are smaller, there are more pixels, colors, contrast, and brightness, which maps to being able to perceive more information in the focused part of the field of vision, so while it might appear that a smaller screen maps to not being to see so much as a larger screen, this is not the way it works, even though it can appear to be a bit counterintuitive at first . . .

tubatimberinger wrote:Your assertion that N3 is perfectly fine and stable and therefore able to take a back seat to ipad development is one I take particular exception to.


The assertion I made is that for what I need to do, Notion 3 is perfectly fine and stable, as well as being accurate, reliable, and simply amazing . . .

However, this does not imply that I suggested that Notion 3 should take a back seat to iPad application development, since I never made that suggestion . . .

In fact, I made nearly the exact opposite of that inference, where my assertion is that Notion Music focusing at present on iPad application development maps directly to doing work on the technologies used in Notion 3, which since there is considerable similarity in much of iOS and Mac OS X in turn maps to doing work on NOTION . . .

This is easier to understand if you do a bit of reading and studying with respect to gaining a high-level overview of iOS and Mac OS X application programming, where focusing on frameworks is very productive for this purpose . . .

iOS Developer Center (Apple Developer Connection)

You could devote several months to reading and studying the various application development documentation, but the summary is that there is a lot of commonality, which maps to a good bit of what one does for an iOS application being directly applicable for a Mac OS X application, and this is the key to understanding my perspective on Notion Music doing iPad application development . . .

Using a vastly oversimplified analogy, metaphor, or simile, it is like someone canning tomatoes for a while, but other folks complaining that canning tomatoes has nothing to do with making spaghetti sauce, except that canned tomatoes are a key ingredient of spaghetti sauce, so in the grand scheme of everything canning tomatoes applies directly to making spaghetti sauce, and in fact makes a lot of sense, because it ensures that the cook has a ready source of higher quality tomatoes for making spaghetti sauce, which maps to making better spaghetti sauce . . .

tubatimberinger wrote:I am guessing you have not been using Notion since 1x and maybe this is shapes your perspective a bit. It is not designed for pop music. It was designed for composers of orchestral music.


I started doing computer-based composing with Notion SLE for Miroslav Philharmonik and then quickly upgraded to Notion 3 so that I could use all the IK Multimedia virtual instruments, so my foray into the universe of computer-based composing essentially started with Notion 3, and this certainly has a profound influence on my perspective . . .

And my perspective is that Notion 3 is a composing and audio generating tool that creates outstanding high-quality audio using virtual instruments that are programmed using music notation, which is genre agnostic . . .

Music notation is a language, and as such it can be used to express whatever you need and want it to express . . .

Notion 3 currently is packaged with a set of primarily orchestral instruments and sound sample libraries, but this is not a limiting factor, since Notion 3 uses VSTi virtual instruments, and so long as a virtual instrument supports VSTi technology, Notion 3 can use it . . .

At present, I am focused primarily on having a lot of FUN with DISCO and Pop, as well as doing experiments to determine the rules for "sparkling" the notes of an instrument, but music notation can be used for any genre that is based on 12 semitones per octave . . .

But if you create your own custom sample libraries there is a way to do music in scales or musical systems that have smaller increments, where for example you can divide an octave into 24 increments and then record notes tuned accordingly but map the sampled notes arbitrarily to specific keys on a virtual keyboard so that instead of C4 to C6 being two octaves it is one octave and the keys from C4 to C6 map to quartertones rather than semitones, such that the whole step from standard C4 to D4 is mapped to the keyboard keys {C4, C#4, D4, D#4, E}, which is a bit strange, but drumkits are mapped in a similar way, which makes it something that can be done in a reasonably straightforward way . . .

Lots of FUN! :)
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby sepheritoh » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:42 am

The pure suggestion that the ipad is a toy reveals more about the person who make the suggestion's fear of technological advancement than it say anything about the product. Facts are as laid out above. I work at the largest motor manufacturer in this country. This week I did a quick count amongst our executives (vice and executive presidents and president) and was pleased to find that 75% of them owns an ipad and takes it everywhere they go. This is simply the best way for a business man on the move to remain in constant contact with the office and be able to work productively while on the move. Are the all kids playing with toys? This company would not have been where it is with children at the top.
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby wcreed51 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:21 pm

Certainly true.

But we’re not talking about remaining in constant contact. We’re talking about composing music…
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wcreed51
 
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Location: Berkshires, MA USA

Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:00 pm

sepheritoh wrote:The pure suggestion that the ipad is a toy reveals more about the person who make the suggestion's fear of technological advancement than it say anything about the product. Facts are as laid out above. I work at the largest motor manufacturer in this country. This week I did a quick count amongst our executives (vice and executive presidents and president) and was pleased to find that 75% of them owns an ipad and takes it everywhere they go. This is simply the best way for a business man on the move to remain in constant contact with the office and be able to work productively while on the move. Are the all kids playing with toys? This company would not have been where it is with children at the top.

And these executives are composing music?? So their ownership of iPad is driving the music composing software market?? If so, I hope that the do a better job at it than at running the motor industry ( I assume you mean cars) because if they falter (AGAIN) then Notion delvelopers will be in line with them for the next Govt. bailout!
geebo2b
 
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Re: What happened to Notion?

Postby geebo2b » Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:06 pm

sepheritoh wrote:The pure suggestion that the ipad is a toy reveals more about the person who make the suggestion's fear of technological advancement than it say anything about the product. Facts are as laid out above. I work at the largest motor manufacturer in this country. This week I did a quick count amongst our executives (vice and executive presidents and president) and was pleased to find that 75% of them owns an ipad and takes it everywhere they go. This is simply the best way for a business man on the move to remain in constant contact with the office and be able to work productively while on the move. Are the all kids playing with toys? This company would not have been where it is with children at the top.

BTW, how many Presidents, vice presidents and executive presidents are in your company?? Sounds like there are dozens. If there are only :ugeek: a few..4-6, then 75% is insignificant, and just wondering if you questioned them as to how they were using them? Grocery list? Pick up cleaning? Composing symphonies? Writing the next big hit for Lady Gaga?
geebo2b
 
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